Réseau européen sur les Gender Studies dans l’Antiquité
European network on Gender Studies in Antiquity

EuGeStA is an international network which brings together European researchers working from the perspectives developed in Gender Studies in different disciplinary fields of Antiquity : literature, philosophy, history, history of art, history of religion, law, medicine, economics, archaeology…

There are two kinds of activities undertaken :
- the organisation of seminars rotating between the partner universities of the network
- the maintenance of a website which is concerned to promote contacts and exchanges between researchers and students.

Editor : JACQUELINE FABRE-SERRIS
Scientific committee : FEDERICA BESSONE, CLAUDE CALAME, VERONIQUE DASEN, THERESE FUHRER, HENRIETTE HARICH, ALISON KEITH, HELEN KING, ALISON SHARROCK, VIOLAINE SEBILLOTTE-CUCHET, GIULIA SISSA, THOMAS SPAETH

Last update : April, 16th 2014


How about ? :
- New release : Issue n°3 journal EuGeStA
Go on the site of the journal
posted on 16/12/2013


- Call for papers Women in Classical Antiquity: Between Image and Lived Realities
Chairs: Dr. Diana Rodríguez-Pérez (Edinburgh-FECYT) and Dr. Glenys Davies (Edinburgh)
We invite offers of papers to form a conference panel at the 8th Celtic Conference in Classics, to be held at the University of Edinburgh from 25-28 June, 2014.
Read more...
posted on 26/08/2013

- Call for Affiliations between EuGeStA and the Women’s Classical Caucus


Next events :

- On 8-9 April, 2014 : The next meeting of the EuGeStA network, organized by Alison Sharrock, will take place at the University of Manchester, UK
The subject will be Motherhood in Antiquity.
Papers already promised range across Greece and Rome, literature and history, from pregnancy to the mothering of adult children. We aim, in particular, to analyse motherhood as far as possible from the female perspective, reading through the heavily male-dominated culture to try to reach some sort of sense of how motherhood might have been constructed and experienced for ancient Greek and Roman mothers. While we would not expect to be able to hear genuine mothers’ voices unmediated, except in a few highly unusual circumstances like that of Cornelia, nonetheless we hope to take the woman’s part, whether as a specific historical personage, a fictional character, or a type. Further details of the programme, together with booking information, will be posted here and on the Manchester University website in the near future.
> Event page on The University of Manchester website.
posted on 29/04/2013